Cheese Manufacturers

Arena Cheese

Arena,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.161763, -89.907842

Arena Cheese is located in the Wisconsin River Valley on State Highway 14 in Arena, Wisconsin. Arena Cheese is the home of the original Co-Jack Cheese and is easily recognized by the mouse in front of the cheese and gift store.

Arena Cheese provides a viewing area so you can watch our artesian cheese maker making different varieties of cheeses. Samples of some of our various cheeses are available for your tasting pleasure. Don?t forget to take home fresh ?squeaky? cheese curds made daily.

Bunker Hill Cheese

Millersburg,

Lattitude/Longitude
40.573978, -81.781528

Our Grandfather, John (Hans) Dauwalder, trained as a master cheese-maker in Switzerland, came to the United States in the 1920's to display his artisan talents in an increasing cheese market.

Like other Swiss farmers who made cheese on their farms and wished to emigrate to the United States, the brothers were listed with other individuals ?desiring to come over,? and were sought after in the American cheese-making market.

The Dauwalder brothers made their way to the Doughty Valley near Berlin. During World War II John returned to his native country to serve it and to provide shelter to refugees on his farm until the war was over.

After the war, John sold his farm in Switzerland and along with his wife, Lili, returned to the U. S. and purchased the cheese-making business Crist had founded.

Peter and Nancy Dauwalder, bought the company in 1962. The Dauwalders, too, began with three copper kettles; they are now in their third generation of family-owned cheese production. They utilized their particular family recipe, guaranteeing an individual taste. Other factors affect that unique taste as well. Even if every producer used the same recipe, the resulting cheese would still taste different due to the environment in which the cultures are grown and the variations in moisture content.

Heini?s cheese caters to specialty food distributors and consumers with ?more of a European style flavor and quality.?

At Bunker Hill, the curds are pressed into forms for a minimum of 12 hours, decreasing the whey moisture as well as the salt content needed in the product, the more liquid moisture we get out, the firmer the product.

Heini?s specialty is yogurt cheese, a pleasant, mild-flavored product whose popularity has grown substantially over the last two decades.

Bunker Hill products include a variety of other cheeses, including Swiss, Colby, Cheddar, and farmer?s, a mild, less fatty cheese good for deli sandwiches.

Due to the company?s interest in the health quality of its cheeses, which contain no artificial coloring or additives. In addition, and just as importantly, Heini?s guarantees that the milk it uses is 100 percent Amish milk from local Amish farmers, many of whom have extremely small herds that are afforded lush pasture land for grazing. Those farmers sign contracts saying they use no artificial hormones or bovine growth hormones.

Cabot Creamery

Cabot,

Lattitude/Longitude
44.400307, -72.314499

"There's efficiency and strength when we work together." That's the principle on which the Cabot Creamery Cooperative was founded by the farmers of Cabot, Vermont in 1919. It's the same principle on which the Cabot brand and its parent cooperative, Agri-Mark, continue to thrive today.

As it was early last century, Cabot is still a sleepy little farm town tucked into the rocky soil of Vermont's rolling hills. The company is still working hard to bring pleasure to the people who buy our products and value to the farmer-owners who supply our milk. And that's just what we plan to keep on doing for many years to come.

Carr Valley Cheese

La Valle,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.48173, -90.178599

Nestled amongst the rolling hills and lush pastures of central Wisconsin, Carr Valley cheese remains one of Wisconsin?s traditional cheese plants, famous for its cheddar varieties made the old-fashioned way. Owned and operated by the Cook family, Carr Valley will celebrate its 100th anniversary this year.

While tourists, and locals alike, flock to stores in Sauk City, Mauston and La Valle for cheese curds and aged cheddar blocks, what sets the business apart are the specialty cheeses created and produced by Sid Cook.

?The general trend in cheese making is bigger, but here at Carr Valley we have just become more specialized...the cheeses and styles are those others aren?t making,? Sid says with pride.

Sid, certified as a Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker, has concocted not quite a dozen of the 30 cheeses he makes. ?I call them designer cheeses. I designed them and invented them and named them. No one?s making them but me,? Sid says.

A specialty cheese is value-added being made from one or more unique qualities. The Wisconsin Specialty Cheese Institute says that qualities such as exotic origin, processing, design, limited supply extraordinary package or channel of sale can all qualify a cheese as ?specialty.? What remains constant with every specialty cheese is the immense quality of the product.

And, in today?s market-place, consumers seem willing and ready for quality. Many of Sid?s cheeses are small-batch mixed-milk cheeses, meaning they consist of cow?s milk and also sheep and/or goat milk. A cheese of this composition with its unique flavor profile can bring upwards of $8 to $10 per pound.

?Canaria is a mixed-milk cheese...We cure it in olive oil. The cheese is generally about a year old when we begin to sell it. It?s just very lovely.? Sid says the product has an earthy, sweet flavor and a texture similar to that of Parmesan.

Many of Carr Valley?s specialty cheeses are sold to upscale restaurants in Chicago and specialty food stores nationwide with help of a California distributor. Not to fear, Sid?s cheeses can also be found at the plant?s Wisconsin locations.

Sid relates creating a new cheese to cooking. ?You think about what you want to achieve, assess the variables and start mixing.? The cultures, species of milk, coagulants, other ingredients, cook temperatures, how you handle it, whether it?s pressed or allowed to rest, actual curing, temperature, bacteria ? all provide Sid with the opportunity to alter the flavor. ?If you don?t like the cheese a certain way, you can change it,? he says matter of factly.

But he contends that Wisconsin is the place for making specialty cheeses. ?We have the right forages here in Wisconsin for making good cheeses. We can do what other states can?t, as you can?t make the same flavor profiles elsewhere,? Sid explains. He continues by explaining that the weather, soils, forages and use of clover all make a difference in the milk flavor.

Sid?s isn?t the only one interested in specialty cheeses. According to the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board there are more specialty cheeses than ever. More than 11 percent, or 234 million pounds, of the total cheeses produced in Wisconsin during 2001 were classified as ?specialty.? According to the Wisconsin Agricultural Statistics Service, 2001?s production is an increase of 6 percent from the previous year.

Cheesemaking has been a way of life for this fourth-generation cheesemaker. ?From the time I was real little I can remember being in the plant. My first job was to pick up can lids and keep the cans moving...I remember standing on a 5-gallon pail to stir the corners of the vats and even riding my tricycle around the vats,? Sid reminisces.

He continued working at the plant, earning this cheesemaker?s license at 16. After graduating from UW-Platteville, Sid planned to attend law school but wasn?t accepted on his first try. It was then that destiny intervened; Sid spent the year adjusting to married life and working as a cheesemaker. ? I liked it; I liked the life and what I was doing. I saw a lot of opportunity in the business,? Sid says.

Tulane University invited him to join its law program the following fall but Sid decided to pursue a career closer to home in the cheese business, and says he has never regretted the decision. It even appears that Sid?s son, Sam, may continue in the family business. A recent high school graduate, Sam has his cheesemaker?s license and has taken courses at UW-Madison to improve his technique.

It remains that old-fashioned cheddar made the family way is still one of Sid?s favorites. Why cheddar? ?Because you can enjoy the fresh, squeaky curds all the way through to the 5-year-old mature cheeses,? Sid says.

Carr Valley?s 23-pound daisy wheels are nationally known for their quality ? a quality that starts with milk produced by ?cows with names,? says Sid. Milk for the plant comes from local dairy producers, of which some have been shipping to the plant for 20 to 30 years.

Before entering the plant, the milk is pasteurized and filtered. Once in the cheese vat, the milk is held at 90 degrees. As the vat fills with milk a culture is added that produces a lactic acid to ripen the fresh milk. This begins turning the milk into cheese.

During these first steps, the cheesemakers add coloring to some cheese styles, Cheddar being one.

Once the milk has ripened, an enzyme is added to coagulate the milk. The coagulant turns the liquid milk into a jelly-like substance, aided by no longer stirring the product. After the cheese firms, large wire cutters are pushed by cheesemakers to cut the vat into thirds. At this time, the vat temperature is raised to 100 degrees to ?cook? the cheese for 30 minutes. ?Cooking? separates the curds from the whey. Some whey is drawn off the vat and goes to a cream separator before being stored. The cream is used in cream/whey butter. The separated whey ingredient is used in making breads and candy bars.

The curd firms as the whey is drained. The curd is hand cut into slabs which are then stacked and pressed together in a process known as ?cheddaring.? This helps the excess moisture drain and prepares the product for its transformation to cheese.

Once at the proper acidic level, approximately 60 minutes later, the slabs are milled ? shredding the large blocks into bit-sized morsels. Then the curds are salted to preserve the cheese and slow the active cheese culture.

Curds are then formed into 23-pound daisy wheels. These wheels are pressed for thwo to three hours before removing the form. The golden wheels are dried before being coated with wax.

The wax coating seals the cheese from air and mold. The finished wheels are then aged for as little as one week all the way to five years.

Sid produces Fontina and cheddar, both of which he is certified as a master cheesemaker, along with specialty products such as Canaria, Menage, Benedicine, Mobay and Marisa, named for his daughter.

At the La Valle plant, cheddar is made six days a week; the plant is closed on Sundays, Christmas Day and New Year?s Day. Besides the large selection of cheeses, the La Valle location offers plenty of free samples, and a conglomeration of Wisconsin products such as wild rice, ginseng, syrups, honey and pancake mix. The quaint store even includes viewing windows, with 8 a.m.-noon being the best time to observe the cheesemaking process.

Cedar Grove Cheese

Plain,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.279695, -90.028975

Located just east of Hwy 23 in Plain, Cedar Grove Cheese is a family owned cheese factory practicing and teaching the cheesemaking art. We feature the best traditional and specialty cheese you've ever tasted - without artificial hormones or animal enzymes including:

Fresh Cheese Curds
Colby
Marbled Colby
Mild Cheddar
Medium Cheddar
Garlic Dill Cheddar
Sun-dried Tomato Basil Cheddar
Monterey Jack
Pepper Jack
Farmer Cheese

Cedar Grove Cheese specializes in organic cheese which is made from pasteurized whole organic milk. The organic certification is obtained through OCIA. Our other ingredients are cultures, enzymes (non-animal) and salt.

White Cheddar
Monterey Jack
Jalapeno Pepper Jack
Tomato & Basil White Cheddar
Tomato & Basil Farmers Cheese
Reduced Fat/Salt White Cheddar

Crowley Cheese

Healdville,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.449466, -72.815819

Come watch Crowley Cheese being made by hand just as it was over 100 years ago by Winfield Crowley. Our landmark factory was built next to a small mountain brook in 1882 in the then traditional post & beam fashion. Little has changed in over 110 years. You will see a modern cheese factory of the 19th Century - not the 20th.

The entire production is completely ?human? powered. Only a few hundred pounds of cheese are made each day, and the process remains exactly as it was when the factory was established. There is no automatic stirring equipment or any other such devices.

The factory is easily accessible and we make cheese most Mondays through Thursdays. You should call ahead to be sure, if you are making a special trip to see cheese being made.

Healdville is a tiny rural community of a few dozen people, on a paved town highway two miles from Route 103 where the Cheese Shop is located. Many Vermont foods and craft items are available, along with our Crowley Cheese.

Grafton Village Cheese Company (Grafton)

Grafton,

Lattitude/Longitude
,

Grafton Village Cheese Company - A Vermont Tradition Since 1892

Cheesemaking has long been a part of Vermont life. Dairy cows grazing the velvety pastures of the Green Mountain State are a familiar sight, and the milk they produce is one of the state's natural treasures, used to make some of the world's best cheddar cheese.

Grafton, Vermont is a likely setting for a world-class cheddar. Cheesemaking traditions in this historic village date from the 19th century. The Grafton Cooperative Cheese Company was founded in 1892 by dairy farmers who gathered together in a cooperative to make their surplus milk into cheese. In the days before refrigeration, there were many such cooperatives in the rural agricultural communities and an abundance of fresh, creamy milk was turned into a food that could be stored for a longer period of time.

In 1912, a fire destroyed the original factory. Several decades later, the nonprofit Windham Foundation restored the company in the mid 1960s, and a new era for the town was born.

Today, quality and taste are the hallmarks of our company's award-winning, handcrafted cheese. The cheese company is part of the Grafton based Windham Foundation, whose mission is to promote Vermont's rural communities. When you purchase Grafton Village Cheese, you directly support our mission!

We have two production plants: our original in Grafton and a new facility in nearby Brattleboro, Vermont. Each has a retail store with viewing windows to watch cheesemaking and to taste the final product. Learn more about visiting us.

Grafton Village Cheese Company (Brattleboro)

Brattleboro,

Lattitude/Longitude
,

Grafton Village Cheese Company - A Vermont Tradition Since 1892

Cheesemaking has long been a part of Vermont life. Dairy cows grazing the velvety pastures of the Green Mountain State are a familiar sight, and the milk they produce is one of the state's natural treasures, used to make some of the world's best cheddar cheese.

Grafton, Vermont is a likely setting for a world-class cheddar. Cheesemaking traditions in this historic village date from the 19th century. The Grafton Cooperative Cheese Company was founded in 1892 by dairy farmers who gathered together in a cooperative to make their surplus milk into cheese. In the days before refrigeration, there were many such cooperatives in the rural agricultural communities and an abundance of fresh, creamy milk was turned into a food that could be stored for a longer period of time.

In 1912, a fire destroyed the original factory. Several decades later, the nonprofit Windham Foundation restored the company in the mid 1960s, and a new era for the town was born.

Today, quality and taste are the hallmarks of our company's award-winning, handcrafted cheese. The cheese company is part of the Grafton based Windham Foundation, whose mission is to promote Vermont's rural communities. When you purchase Grafton Village Cheese, you directly support our mission!

We have two production plants: our original in Grafton and a new facility in nearby Brattleboro, Vermont. Each has a retail store with viewing windows to watch cheesemaking and to taste the final product. Learn more about visiting us.

Guggisberg Cheese Factory

Charm,

Lattitude/Longitude
40.506294, -81.784633

Cheese-making is an old-world art form, practiced in Amish country and kept alive by generations of family practitioners whose ancestors brought the tasteful tradition with them from the snow-covered mountains of Switzerland to the misty valleys of Ohio.

Each family group, carrying with it a unique way of working through a similar process, makes a product that bears its own special brand of taste and originality.

Alfred and Margaret Guggisberg emigrated in 1947 from Berne, Switzerland, to Millersburg, Ohio. Alfred had studied cheese-making not only in Europe but also in Africa.

Although he originally targeted Austria as the location for his own cheese-making enterprise, a neighbor in Switzerland mentioned Ohio?s need for skilled cheese-makers. He emigrated a year before the rest of his family, all of whom eventually became involved in the business.

His wife, Margaret, whose dream was to operate a "little shop" has been fully realized with the Chalet in the Valley portion of the Guggisberg complex. Alfred has passed away, but Margaret is still active in company business.

Son Eric runs the Swiss Inn, and his brother Richard is in charge of the two factories, the newer of which is located in Sugarcreek.

The entire complex began with nothing more than large copper kettles?which could produce up to a 200-pound block of cheese a day?and old world family ingenuity, perseverance, and tradition. As the area grew, so did the Guggisberg cheese factory. By 1967, the family had created its current signature item, Baby Swiss.

Over the years, customers have come to crave the ?mild, creamy? flavor of Baby Swiss, so named by Magaret Guggisberg because she thought it looked like the small offspring of the original Swiss cheese.

The cheese-making process at Guggisberg begins early in the morning with the purchase of milk, primarily from farmers in Wayne and Holmes County who maintain comparatively small herds.

Pasteurized milk is then pumped into three stainless steel vats and held for three to four hours. It goes through several different stages during which curds and whey (the watery portion of the milk) are separated. Whey is stored for use in other products. Curds, the component used for cheese, are pressed down with heavy lids that press out as much of the whey as possible and flatten the cheese into wheel molds.

After the cheese is packaged, it must be moved to warming cellars. It is this portion of the process through which it gains its flavor and its holes. Each package is dated and tracked with weight and type noted to assure the proper length of time needed to allow trapped carbon dioxide to release and ?pop the holes.?

The ingredients that make each cheese slightly different are the cultures and enzymes that are added to the vats and that ?go to work in the warming cellar.?

The flavor of cheese is even affected by the time of the year in which the milk is produced and by what the cows are eating.

Fat and protein content are also adjusted for different types of cheese. In general, fattier cheeses are creamier.

When the cheese is aged and ready, Guggisberg sells it wholesale, retail, and through mail order distribution in Ohio and the Pittsburgh area, although we are starting to spread out a bit.

Cheese can continue to age slowly, even once it has reached its peak, in a cold cellar for up to two years; a period of six months produces a sharper flavor. Left outside of refrigeration to ?puff out,? as some customers like it to do, is safe because a vacuum-packed seal assures it will not mold.

The Guggisberg Cheese Factory was founded by a Swiss cheesemaker and is now Swiss family owned and operated. Nestled in the hills of Doughty Valley and surrounded by flowers, Guggisberg Cheese is home to the Original Baby Swiss. There are many varieties of cheese available in the cheese and gift shop, as well as imported Swiss chocolates and cuckoo clocks. Located near the Guggisberg Swiss Inn is a place where guests can experience buggy rides, sleigh rides, and a trail riding (seasonal).

Hilmar Cheese Company

Hilmar,

Lattitude/Longitude
37.419666, -120.850123

When a dozen California dairy farmers joined together to found Hilmar Cheese Company in 1984, they were enthusiastic because their Jersey cows were particularly good at producing high-protein milk, ideal for making cheese. The dairymen worked hard, the cows worked hard, and the cheesemakers worked hard as the business grew. Today, Hilmar Cheese Company products are known around the world for excellent quality, great taste and superior functionality. State of the art production facilities enable us to produce a variety of high quality cheese while meeting diverse customer specifications.

Our cheesemakers will explain how fresh milk is turned into tasty Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese in our "Cheese Theatre." Explore our interactive exhibits about agriculture, the dairy industry and cheesemaking. Meet "Buttercup," dress as a cheesemaker and "mix a meal" for a cow in our miniature mixer wagon. See modern technology package 500-pound barrels and 640-pound blocks of cheese!

Oakdale Cheese

Oakdale,

Lattitude/Longitude
37.776264, -120.812084

Cheesemaking has been in Walter?s family for 4 generations. So, it came natural to follow his ancestors footsteps when he bought his first cheese vat in 1983. It was in Escalon, hidden in an almond orchard, where the family remodeled an old dairy barn and produced their native Gouda cheese, Quark and Yogurt for the first 12 years. Sales were done on Certified Farmers Markets, by Mail Order and through a small room in their garage with refrigerator, where people could just walk in and leave their money on the counter top. Talking about honesty and trust!

With a leaking roof, bad floors and a lot of maintenance, they very happily moved to Oakdale in 1995, with a big bag of money loaned from the local Delta National bank in Manteca. It's here the Bulk?s really started living their American Dream, by building and developing a brand new location for their home, their cheesemaking and (hopefully!) their future customers.

Old Country Wisconsin Cheese, Inc.

Cashton,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.804805, -90.773634

The Old Country Wisconsin Cheese factory is located in the heart of the Amish community in Western Wisconsin. We accept fresh can milk from 230 Amish milk producers who live around Cashton, Hillsboro, Tomah, Wilton, Sylvan, Readstown, Liberty Pole, and Chaseburg. Old Country Cheese brings in 120,000 pounds of milk a day from over 230 Amish milk producers.

Old Country Wisconsin Cheese is one of only a few factories left in the United States that handles only fresh can milk. In 1982, the Old Order Amish Community of Cashton reached a consensus. Having their own cheese factory was the best way to provide Amish dairy farmers with a continuing market for milk shipped in traditional cans.

In the spring of 1983, Old Country Cheese accepted our first milk, 32,000 pounds a day from Amish milk producers.

Come watch us make pure Wisconsin cheese! Visit our shop to buy from our wide assortment of Wisconsin cheeses, as well as Amish made crafts, candy, and maple syrup.

Springside Cheese Factory

Oconto Falls,

Lattitude/Longitude
44.9639490, -88.1618520

Springside Cheese Corporation is a family owned Wisconsin cheese manufacturer of traditional and flavored artisan cheese. One of the last few cheese factories in Northeast Wisconsin, Springside Cheese has been making hand crafted, rich and creamy cheese since 1908.

Visit us at our cheese factory to view the cheese making process through windows overlooking the facility. There are also pictures overhead depicting how we make our artisan cheese. Staff is always available to answer any questions you might have. We look forward to seeing you soon.

The Grafton Village Cheese Company

Grafton,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.172789, -72.609139

In the first decades of the 1800s, Grafton was a thriving settlement on the post road from Boston to Albany. The town had many farms, over 10,000 sheep, sawmills, gristmills, tanneries, woolen mills, a soapstone quarry, a carriage and sleigh factory, an inn and several stores. By the mid 1800s many of New England's farmers had moved westward and the region's once strong wool industry had collapsed under the pressures of Australian competition. Like many towns around it, Grafton was no longer on the main thoroughfare.

The Grafton Village Cheese Company was founded in 1890 as the Grafton Cooperative Cheese Company, and converted surplus milk from local dairy farmers into cheese.

Some years later, a fire destroyed the original factory. When the nonprofit Windham Foundation restored the company in the mid 1960s, a new era for the town was born.

Today, quality and taste are still the hallmarks of the company's products. The cheese company is a subsidiary of the Grafton based Windham Foundation, known throughout Vermont for its philanthropy and preservation work in Grafton, Vermont.

We have a large viewing window where you can watch the cheese being made as well as a 10 min video explaining the whole process. Best viewing times for the cheese making process is mid-morning.

Tillamook Cheese Factory

Tillamook,

Lattitude/Longitude
45.485685, -123.84523

The Visitor's Center offers a free self-guided tour, showcasing the entire cheese making process from cow to mouth.

The viewing platforms above packaging and cheese offer people a chance to see exactly where the cheese comes from and how it is made. There are interactive kiosks providing nutritional information that kids of all ages can enjoy.

As visitors reach the end of the tour, they are treated to samples of Tillamook's famous cheese. A variety of chunks, as well as fresh curds, is a great way to cap off an informative introduction to the world of cheese. By now people want to take some home for family and friends. What better place than at the Visitor's Center retail store, where all of the Tillamook products are available?

Union Star Cheese

Zittau,

Lattitude/Longitude
44.2168220, -88.7879500

Union Star -- making quality cheese for more than a century
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It all began with the age-old question of ?low fat.?

In the early 1900s, almost all Wisconsin dairy farmers sold their milk to local cheese factories. The introduction of the ?Babcock Test? - a method for determining the butterfat content of milk ? led to scaled pricing of milk based on fat content. Simply put, cheese factories were only willing to pay top dollar for milk with a high fat content. Thirteen farmers including our Great Grand Uncle, Henry Metzig, were upset that their milk was considered ?low fat,? and responded by starting their own cheese factory as a co-op in Zittau, Wisconsin.

In 1911, Henry bought out the others and formed Union Star. To close that deal, however, Henry had to make a major commitment ? agree to work on Sunday. Since the co-op had always been closed on Sunday, the local farmers? wives had been left to deal with that day?s milk production themselves. This was no small task, because Sundays were focused on preparing the family dinner and going to church. In the end, Henry agreed that it was better for one cheesemaker to go to Hell than all the farmers' wives.

Back in those days, there were more than 2,800 small cheese factories scattered across Wisconsin. Today, there are only a handful of these factories still in operation. Our family?s continued success is due, in part, to the cheesemaking?s own version of women?s liberation.

Henry?s daughter, Edna, was one of the first women to become a licensed cheesemaker and work in a factory setting. It was no surprise that soon after marrying local cheesemaker Eugene Lehman, they were running the Union Star factory. What did surprise the neighbors, however, was when they opened a small retail storefront. You see, cheesemakers back then were not known for dealing well with customers.

My wife, Jan, and I bought Union Star from Great Aunt Edna in 1980. I had a degree in accounting and, just like my Great Grand Uncle, wanted to run my own business. The family tradition of independent cheesemaking carried the day and we?ve been here ever since. Today, our sons are also part of the Union Star story.

Over the years, we?ve added new cheeses to our line and obtained new equipment. Our dedication to quality, however, has remained the same. We still purchase top quality milk from local dairy farms and turn it into premium cheeses.

If you?d like to taste some of the finest Wisconsin cheeses, see a real cheese factory in operation, or learn more about how cheese is made, come on in and see us.

Widmer's Cheese Cellars

Theresa,

Lattitude/Longitude
43.517409, -88.452644

The story of Widmer's Cheese begins over 70 years ago, when our founder, John O. Widmer, left Switzerland to come to America. He choose to settle in one of the most famous cheese producing regions of the world, Dodge County Wisconsin. As did many Swiss immigrants, John O. Widmer became a cheese maker. He worked in various cheese factories as an apprentice before settling in Theresa Wisconsin in 1922.

His theory was quality first, and he consistently strove to produce a better product. He passed on his methods to his three sons John, Ralph and Jim who have since retired, and passed on the family business and tradition to Joe Widmer.

Embracing the manufacturing techniques which have been handed down through generations of cheese makers, Widmer's Cheese Cellars offers a Wisconsin original, Wisconsin Brick cheese, a cheese of unsurpassed distinction. Much like a limited edition book or lithograph, Widmer Brick is hand-crafted in small batches to ensure quality. Brick's earthy, sweet flavor and its slice ability make it not only delicious, but easy to use as a table cheese or as an ingredient.

Winchester Cheese Company

Winchester,

Lattitude/Longitude
33.670565, -117.093623

Winchester Cheese Company is owned and operated by Jules Wesselink who was born and raised in Haarlem, Holland. Jules has operated his own dairies in California since the 1950's. As the metropolitan Los Angeles area has grown Jules's dairies have moved from Artesia to Chino, and now to Winchester. The dairy now has 500 Holstein cows and is located in a beautiful setting as you can see from the accompanying photos.
BOERE KAAS, which means "Home made on the farm", is the favorite choice of cheese-loving Holland. In a class by itself, it is distinguished by its delicious and unique flavor in comparison to cheese mass produced in factories. Our cheese is made by Valerie Thomas, Jules Wesselink's daughter, and David Thomas, her husband.

We take pride in making "Gouda" Boere Kaas in Winchester, California in the same traditional way as it has been done by our families back home in Holland for many, many generations.
We make it on the farm in Winchester in the same natural way, using the same natural ingredients and fresh raw milk. Then we age it like fine wine, to perfection, to bring out its natural goodness.
The only difference we allow ourselves is that we no longer use wooden tubs and tools. We now use shining stainless steel vats and utensils. The Taste Remains unmistakably... "Gouda" Boere Kaas!

Field trips and Guided Tours are available. Call for details.
You and your children will enjoy your visit to The Winchester Cheese Company and Dairy. We are located within easy driving distance from both Los Angeles and San Diego. You may wish to make a day trip and visit local wineries and see the enormous new Southern California Water Reservoir being constructed on our doorstep.